Tag Archive: checking email



Like most people you have an inbox. Tell the truth about it and you’ve got multiple inboxes, right? Hopefully you have multiple virtual mail boxes because it’s your way of separating your business and personal worlds, not because you added them frivolously.

Given the times and the overload of information we each get on a daily basis, people are inundated with email. Most of us receive about 150 emails a day and for many the majority go without being read. This has become the norm and people have come accustomed to being on multiple email lists and part of their regular rhythm is to continue to subscribe to more.

There’s way too much going on that has your inbox (or inboxes) get and stay bogged down and cluttered and this does absolutely nothing for you in regards to staying productive.

  • An average of 150 emails a day
  • Most go unread
  • Staying subscribed to lists that no longer serve you or your interest
  • Missing what you need to have access to

Your inbox deserves better and so do you. Treating your inbox like sacred space means setting a criteria for what is allowed. So now you might be saying, “But where do I start?” because you’ve got 30K emails plus and just can’t see it happening.  You can get there one step at a time and here’s your check list:

  1. Take inventory. What’s there? Emails that haven’t been read, things you kept because of the attachments or other info? If you haven’t read it, delete it and if it’s from a list you subscribed to, get off the list. Chances are you haven’t read much of what they’ve send and won’t. Save any attached documents to your computer, get info into a file and dates into your calendar and delete, delete, delete!
  2. Get off the list. Sort your inbox alphabetically by sender so you can see what you get regularly. You might not even remember who some of those people are, so open one of the emails, scroll to the bottom and unsubscribe from what’s not relevant. If you have a long list of subscriptions, check out Unroll.Me and instantly see all your subscription emails and get rid of what you don’t want. Once you’re done, delete those emails.
  3. Make your list. Now determine the email that you want to allow; what deserves space. Be tough and make sure you can justify why something needs to hit your inbox.
  4. Set up an email tool like SaneBox to keep the order. It will review your email history and habits, keep the unimportant stuff out of your inbox so you can focus on what matters. The unimportant things got to another folder for you to review later. Once you set it up and have a clean inbox, you can clean up the “Sane Later” folder and then do the regular maintenance.
  5. Create supportive habits. Moving forward you need habits to keep your inbox sacred so set times to check email during the day, use folders and filters to send certain emails to designated folders and check them regularly. Download attachments and info you need and delete the email and empty your trash folder daily.

 


WomanSittingHoldingClockAs a Productivity Coach I’ve seen many things over the years and there are mistakes that I’ve seen people making all the while.In this post I’m going to share three that are quite common. First and foremost, you’re checking your email first thing in the morning. STOP IT! Now I know this is a hard one for some of you because you live in your inbox. Close your email when you’re not checking and replying to it. Plain and simple, email is a distraction and a major time suck!

Instead of diving head first into your inbox at the beginning of your work day, is to check your email 1½ -2 hours after you start your day. Use the first 1.5 to 2 hours of your day to focus on your top priority for the day. By the end of that period of time, you’ll either be done with that task, or you’ll have a good dent in it. This makes the first couple of hours of your day more productive instead of you fishing around in your inbox and having a priority sit on hold.

Working against your grain is one of the worst things that you can do to yourself. It zaps your level of productivity. What works is to learn your personal energy cycles and use them to make your day productive. If you don’t know what time of day is best for you, start taking notice to see when your physical and mental energy is highest. You might find that you’re not at your best until almost noon and that you can work past dinner time before you start to fade. Make the shift in your day and use that time for the things that require you to be at your best. Use the other time in your day for things that don’t require so much of you like returning phone calls.

The third mistake is not spending enough time on top priorities. You can be busy all day and still not get the important things done. You’ve got to know what your priorities are before you get in motion. Look at the projects and goals on your agenda and determine their priority before anything related to them hits your daily list or calendar. If you know your priorities prior to adding them to your activities, you know what your focus should be on and therefore, you can focus your time on your priorities so that the important things get done.

Those are just three of the mistakes that you could be making when it comes to productivity. Take action to shift from what you’re currently doing and you’ll see a difference.

 


To add to my first email tip of not checking email first thing in the morning, have a plan when it comes to checking email.  For most of us checking email once a day isn’t productive.  As I mentioned in my previous post, check email 1.5-2 hours into your day and additionally, choose one to two other times during the day to check and reply to email, and turn off your email notifications.  Set a reminder and stay on schedule.   This will ensure that you’re responding to requests in a timely manner and being productive as well.

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