Tag Archive: delegate


Being In The Flow


Meditating At The WaterI remember a conversation two friends had about me years ago that they shared with me. One of the things that was said during their conversation was that they had no idea how I managed to get everything done. At the time I was working 40-50 hours a week, going to school full time and I was a single parent. The truth is, I didn’t even think about how to get it all done, I just did it. Looking back at that time and the number of things I managed to stay on top of without missing a beat I saw that it was my intention that helped me.

I had learned to give myself a more stable foundation for getting things done and took steps to personalize my approach to it all and those things along with having a system worked, but intention was what helped me flow. Intention is a powerful thing.  It can be described as a mental state that represents a commitment to carrying out an action or actions in the future. Desire causes intention, which causes action, which of course then causes the outcome.  Intention is what starts the momentum; the flow, and allows it to grow if you align yourself with it.

Aligning yourself with it means applying leverage by delegating the things that don’t require your expertise to complete. It also means making time to relax, the really breathe and appreciate things as they are and visualizing your outcome. Once you create the alignment, you can follow with inspired action which leads to more momentum and places you in the flow of things. Your mind shifts and is a part of the flow you’ve created and everything begins to line up.

When you are in this space of flow, there is no stopping you simply because you have set the intention and have a willingness to do that which needs to be done. You begin to see what things belong on your daily agenda and which don’t, so you delegate or remove them altogether. You’re able to start your day knowing there is much to do and that you will handle every task before you, and it happens just that way. You know when to ask for clarity and when you need to ask for help. Having the physical things in place to support your productivity is necessary and when you purposely create the environment within your being so that you flow, you become more effective and more efficient than ever. Being in the flow is how you get it all done.

 


Lotus PoseOne reason most solopreneurs start their own business is because they want freedom and flexibility.  They want to be able to run the show and at the same time be able to take time off when they choose for fun and family.  This sounds ideal and it can be, but one big challenge that solopreneurs face is that they’re doing everything themselves.  They start out that way and things tend to stay that way, which doesn’t allow much time for the fun and family, so they end up without the freedom and flexibility they were looking for when they started.

If you really want that freedom and flexibility that you were looking for when you started your business, your business has to run smoothly and it has to be able to run without you in the mix.  Can you say that right now if you chose to take a few days off that things would keep moving along?  If not, there are three things that you can do starting right now that will help you keep things up and running.

First, create systems that will help you streamline things.  Most people cringe at the thought of creating systems because they think systems have to be big, complex and cumbersome.  Truth is, they really don’t.  A system has three components: processes, tools and people.  That’s it, and the components can be as simple or as complex as you like.  Place your focus on determining the processes within each, the tools that will be necessary to perform those processes and the people who will use the tools to carry out the processes.  Creating the systems that you need to keep your business running smoothly will cause you to invest some time, it’s not something that can happen over night, but it’s not something that has to take an extended period of time either.  Invest the time in yourself and in your business to take the steps necessary to determine and then set up the systems that will support you on a daily basis.

Once you have the systems created and up and running, document what you do and how it’s done so that you end up with standard operating procedures manual that anyone can follow to get the job done.  If you keep the procedures updated, anyone should be able to review a procedure and perform the designated task without a problem.

Another step in taking on the challenge of doing everything yourself, is to begin to delegate.  Let’s face it; you started your business not only for that freedom and flexibility, but to make money.  You can’t make the money that you want to make if you’re occupied with tasks that aren’t making you money.  Look at the things that you do on a regular basis and determine whether or not you have to be the one to do each.  Ask yourself if you are the only one who can do this and if the particular task is the best use of your time.  If the task at hand doesn’t require your knowledge or expertise, it belongs in the hands of a capable, trusted individual so that you can focus on the revenue generating things.  Delegating for some is not an easy thing to do.  Letting go can be a process in and of itself which is fine, the important thing is to let go of the things that don’t require your time.

If you haven’t invested in a virtual assistant, consider doing so.  If you don’t want to go that route, find a college student looking to fulfill an internship requirement. Make sure that whomever you choose has the skills to perform the job that you’re asking them to do.  Don’t be fooled into thinking that the time that it will take to train this individual will be time that you can spend on doing the things that you’re teaching them to do.  Use the operations manual that you create during your systems set up to guide them through the processes you’re introducing them to and make adjustments in the procedure where necessary.   The time that you spend teaching is time invested in your business and your bottom line.

 


WomanandGearsOne reason most solopreneurs start their own business is because they want freedom and flexibility.  They want to be able to run the show and at the same time be able to take time off when they choose for fun and family.  This sounds ideal and it can be, but one big challenge that solopreneurs face is that they’re doing everything themselves.  They start out that way and things tend to stay that way, which doesn’t allow much time for the fun and family, so they end up without the freedom and flexibility they were looking for when they started.

If you really want that freedom and flexibility that you were looking for when you started your business, your business has to run smoothly and it has to be able to run without you in the mix.  Can you say that right now if you chose to take a few days off that things would keep moving along?  If not, there are three things that you can do starting right now that will help you keep things up and running.

First, create systems that will help you streamline things.  Most people cringe at the thought of creating systems because they think systems have to be big, complex and cumbersome.  Truth is, they really don’t.  A system is has three components: processes, tools and people.  That’s it, and the components can be as simple or as complex as you like.  The most important thing is determining the processes within each, the tools that will be necessary to perform those processes and the people who will use the tools to carry out the processes.  Creating the systems that you need to keep your business running smoothly will cause you to invest some time, it’s not something that can happen over night, but it’s not something that has to take an extended period of time either.  Invest the time in yourself and in your business to take the steps necessary to determine and then set up the systems that will support you on a daily basis.

Once you have the systems created and up and running, document what you do and how it’s done so that you end up with standard operating procedures manual that anyone can follow to get the job done.  If you keep the procedures updated, anyone should be able to review a procedure and perform the designated task without a problem.

Another step in taking on the challenge of doing everything yourself, is to begin to delegate.  Let’s face it; you started your business not only for that freedom and flexibility, but to make money.  You can’t make the money that you want to make if you’re occupied with tasks that aren’t making you money.  Look at the things that you do on a regular basis and determine whether or not you have to be the one to do each.  Ask yourself if you are the only one who can do this and if the particular task is the best use of your time.  If the task at hand doesn’t require your knowledge or expertise, it belongs in the hands of a capable, trusted individual so that you can focus on the revenue generating things.  Delegating for some is not an easy thing to do.  Letting go can be a process in and of itself which is fine, the important thing is to let go of the things that don’t require your time.  If you haven’t invested in a virtual assistant, consider doing so.  If you don’t want to do that route, find a college student looking to fulfill an internship requirement. Make sure that whomever you choose has the skills to perform the job that you’re asking them to do.  Don’t be fooled into thinking that the time that it will take to train this individual will be time that you can spend on doing the things that you’re teaching them to do.  Use the operations manual that you create during your systems set up to guide them through the processes you’re introducing them to and make adjustments in the procedure where necessary.   The time that you spend teaching is time invested in your business and your bottom line.

 


Women are wearing the usual crazy number of hats, life is moving at the speed of light and people are caught up and nothing’s slowing down.  For many of those who are caught up, there’s always something to do and most times what they can only see is what they haven’t done.  When you’re caught up like this, with no end in sight, you’re not giving yourself credit for the things that you do accomplish.  You don’t see your accomplishments because you’re too busy trying to maintain the juggling act; you’re looking for the next thing that there is to do and you feel as though if you’re not doing something, something’s wrong.

Stop and take a step back from that vicious cycle and take a moment to simply breathe.  Stop looking for the next thing to do–it’s going to be there when you finish breathing, trust me; it’s not going anywhere.  After taking a few deep, cleansing breaths, take stock in what you have accomplished.  Don’t think about what you haven’t done yet or the about the things hanging over your head, let that go.  Look back on your day, your week, your month and take inventory.  What have you accomplished?  Furthermore, what does having those things done allow you to do?  Maybe the things that you finished earlier this week are going to allow you to help your clients be better at what they do in some way, or to have a breakthrough that they’ve been trying to have but just can’t seem to get.  Whatever it is, take time to think about the results of your efforts.  Take the opportunity to marvel at what you’ve done instead of sliding it under the rug.

Make it your business to take this step back on a regular basis so that you can gain some perspective, and stop beating yourself up because there’s still so much to do.  Then, choose the appropriate tools to support you in your daily quest to get things done and create systems that will help you increase your productivity and breeze through your to-do list.  while you’re at it , delegate the tasks you can and get rid of the things that don’t line up with your values and what you’re focused on.  You’ll find that it will lighten your load and that you’ll be focused on what matters most.


When it comes to getting and staying organized one challenge is the #1 culprit, paper, also known as, the paper tiger.  This is true for both home and work environments.  If you’re challenged with clutter, look at the clutter to see what percentage of your clutter is paper.  Of all the things that can possibly clutter any given space, paper usually paper comes out on top, not that it’s a good thing.

The paper tiger comes about for several reasons: people keep documents that are no longer relevant or that they don’t need, they don’t have a system in place for dealing with paper or their filing system is inadequate and usually they aren’t aware that paper falls into one of three categories-action, reference or archive.  No matter what your challenge is, there is a simple process for getting and keeping control of your paper.

If you’re like most, you have stacks of paper.  Get yourself out of the overwhelm conversation and start by dealing with one stack of paper at a time.  Go through each one piece of paper at a time and determine the following:

 

  • Is it relevant; do you need it?  Can you get the information again, perhaps from a book or online?
  • What’s the worst thing that could happen if you got rid of it?
    • If it’s no longer relevant, get rid of it!
  • If it is relevant, what needs to happen to it?
    • Does it need to be filed?
    • Do you need to take action on it?
    • Does it need to go to someone else?
  • Sort  the paper  into separate bins; one designated for each of the three options
  • Once that stack is sorted, move to the next stack and continue until you’ve worked your way through each
  • Next, take action on the items in each bin
    • Do the filing
    • Take action on items that require you to do something
    • Delegate the items that need to go to someone else

Finally, to keep the tiger from becoming untamed again, set up a system to help you manage your paper and keep it under control and create new habits that support you in maintaining that system.

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