Tag Archive: planning



The way you start each day sets the tone for it, and likewise, the way you start your year sets the tone for the months ahead. What you have to determine is how you want your year to be and set the stage accordingly. How do you want your year to start? What are you creating in the coming year? Don’t let the way the last year started or ended up discourage you and above all, don’t beat yourself up about the things that you didn’t accomplish. Acknowledge the experience, what you learned from it and let it go so that you can move on.

Create the space you want to live from this coming year and fill it with what you need to move into and through it. Create your goals from the space of the experiences you want to have this year then get focused, commit to them and determine how you’re going to move forward. Start the year with focus and preparation. Sadly, only 8% of people actually achieve what they aim for every year. One reason they do is because of the tone they set at the beginning of it all.

The first 100 days of the year is a crucial period and your entire year rides on it. If you don’t prepare and set the tone and the stage for your year, what’s it going to look like? Will you be well on your way to the income that you want to make this year or another goal that you’ve set or will you be feeling like you didn’t get started right and wanting a do-over and have an excuse for why you haven’t started to forge the path toward the summit?

Excuses and regret aren’t going to cut it so it’s time to stop making them and let them go. Map out your first 100 days of the new year, make the commitment and dive in so deep that you can’t help but get the results you want. If you’ve never done this before, now is the time to start. If you want different results, you’ve got to do something different and take on new ways of being. Before you move on to something else, break out a pad of paper and take 10 minutes to think about what you want to create for the coming year; the experiences you want to have and how that might look. Then you’ll have a place to create your goals from. What will the first 100 days of 2016 look like for you?

 


CleaningIncluded in the non-supportive habits that I encounter with clients, is the habit of dumping things onto to-do lists and calendars. What happens is things come to mind that have to be done or added to your calendar and you cram them in without even thinking about where they should go or if they even fit.  A lot of times it’s because if you don’t, you won’t have a way to remember them.

We’re about a month into Spring and with the season comes the traditional “Spring cleaning” and truthfully, this a good time to clean, purge and organize your office too.  If you didn’t purge and archive files at the end of the year, spring is a good time to do so.  It’s also a good time to look at the systems and routines that you have in place to support you in your day to day activities.  Your office isn’t the only thing that can get cluttered and disorganized.  The same can happen to your calendar and your to-do list.

If you look at your calendar and don’t see time where you’re working on things that are relevant to your business goals and projects or meetings that are related to what you’re up to or where you’re going, then it’s time to clean up your act.  Do you see blocks of me time or are you not even on your own calendar?

Spring clean your calendar by getting rid of the things that aren’t relevant.  If something isn’t relevant it’s not worthy of your time.  If you’re overbooked, reassess what’s there. Everything that you have scheduled time for should have a related priority.  Allow those priorities to determine whether or not the items remain on your calendar.

To continue, look at your to-do list.  Chances are it’s pretty full. Weed out the things that aren’t important and if there are things that you can delegate do it! The things on your to-do list should also have a level of priority assigned to them before things make it to your list. Not having a priority can cost you precious time.

These quick steps will declutter your calendar and your to-do list.  To keep them that way planning is key. As you plan, keep your goals top of mind and don’t allow anything that’s not related to find its way in, and don’t over commit yourself.  Know what you are capable of handling and be realistic.  Before you commit to something, make sure that it’s relevant and that you have the time to dedicate to it.  These things will greatly assist you in managing your work load and keeping extra hours and clutter off of your agenda.

 

 

Me First!



ProjectSuccess-Resize2If you’ve been around for a while you’ve probably heard me say that people cringe when it comes to creating a plan and that some even say it’s a waste of time. Don’t believe the hype! Planning saves you plenty of your precious time and can help keep you from hitting road blocks.

Let’s talk about that plan you’ve created. It might have been hard for you to even do that if you’re one of those people who cringe when they hear the word “plan”, so congrats for getting that done! Your plan might be related to a particular goal, a project or maybe it’s something for a client. Once you’ve got it, you might not know exactly how to proceed. The key is one bite at a time. You take that large meal, so to speak, and break it down into bite sized pieces. In your plan you would have outlined the milestones for each goal or project, and if you didn’t you’ve got to take a step back and do that.

Looking at one milestone, figure out the smaller steps or tasks; the things that need to happen to reach that milestone and add them to your calendar. Putting things on your to-do list is okay if they will take less than 15 minutes, but if they take longer and you don’t have them in your calendar with a set block of time to complete them, you’re asking for trouble. At the beginning of each week, or at the end of the week for the upcoming week, go through this process. It doesn’t take long at all. As you place things on your to-do list and into your calendar, just like eating a meal, you don’t want to bite off more that you can chew. Don’t overload your plate. The other things that have to be done can stay in the fridge until you’re ready for them. Stick to your priorities as you plan. You should have assigned a level of priority to each goal or project when you created it. That allows you to automatically know which related tasks have priority when it comes to scheduling them.

This process, if you’ve created your plan properly, works really well because at this point, your priorities have been determined. Which allows you to focus on them regularly. That’s what gets you where you want to go. This process leaves no room for guessing, because it’s been removed from the equation altogether. You’ve planned your work, now it’s time to work your plan.

 


Planning On Glass BoardWith just a few weeks lift in the year, the air is buzzing with end of the year activities. Sadly, though most people don’t think about the year ahead. If you haven’t already laid out your plan for next year, you’re way behind and it’s time to catch up. I know that some people cringe when they hear the word “plan” or at the thought of having to create one.  I’ve heard so many people say that planning takes too much time or even that it’s a waste of time.  The truth is that planning will actually save you time, guide your actions and help you accomplish what you set out to do.  There is power in the process.

When you don’t plan, the time that you give to execution will take much longer and decrease your productivity level.  Without going through the planning process, unexpected things happen that you didn’t think about and they derail your efforts.  You spend time dealing with the unexpected, looking for solutions to put the fire out and get things going again while work is stagnated.

It only takes about 10-12 minutes to plan your day.  That small investment will save you about two hours every day, which translates to about a 25 percent increase in your level of productivity.  Regular planning has you spend more time on activities of higher value, which in turn increases your effectiveness and your efficiency. Planning will facilitate achievement of your goals, and helps you to make good decisions, define opportunities and possible threats and can even help reduce risk and prevent loss.  Inside of the process you are able to see the resources that you need, map your route and determine how you will deal with any bumps in the road, should you hit them.  All of this becomes possible simply because you make the investment of your time and energy to create the plan.

Statistics show us that every minute that you plan saves you ten in the execution of the plan.  That translates into the time that you make to plan giving you a return of ten times, which is 1,000 percent on the investment of your time and personal energy.  That is huge!  Where else can you make an investment and get this kind of return?

Without planning you don’t know exactly what you’re working on from day to day, every week and over longer periods of time so you play the guessing game on a regular basis or you get in the middle of doing a particular thing and notice that there’s something that you forgot to do—something that should have been done before you started working on your current task.  You also get to points in your process when you realize you don’t have something that you need. Not a good scenario when you’re trying to make things happen and complete the projects on your agenda or reach your goals. You want to know what that next step is. If you don’t it will cost you.

With a plan you’ve done the work that has you already halfway there. Your plan is your map that gives you what you need to move forward and a great chance of success. So, the next time you hear the word “plan”, don’t cringe, embrace the power that the process gives you.  Get prepared for 2015. Plan your work, and work your plan!

 

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